Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan

Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan ( Vol-3,Issue-3,May - June 2018 )

Author: Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob

ijeab doi crossref DOI: 10.22161/ijeab/3.3.14

Keyword: Cajanus cajan, cutting height, plant spacing, cutting interval, fodder yield.

Abstract: Forage production is one of the ways of sustaining ruminant animal production in Nigeria as these animals depend largely on plant-based feed. Hence, Cajanus cajan pasture was established to evaluate the effects of planting space, cutting height and interval at harvest on fodder yield and nutritional value of C. cajan. Pre-planting operations (bush clearing, ploughing, harrowing and ridging) were carried out on a hectare of land, sectionalized into fifteen equal portions. 2 - 3 seeds of C. cajan were planted using five different planting spaces (40x60 cm, 60x60 cm, 80x30 cm, 100x30 cm and 120x30 cm) of three replicates per treatment. Post-planting operations (thinning, supplying and weeding) were done to ensure uniform plant stands, nursed to maturity and harvested at different cutting heights (50, 100 and 150 cm) with cutting intervals from 2, 3 and 4 weeks respectively for five consecutive times to calculate the initial, total and average yield per plot. Air-dried samples of harvested forages were analysed for proximate composition; and data generated were subjected to statistical analysis. Results showed that; C. cajan sown using 40x60 cm planting space, cutting height of 50 cm and cutting interval of 4 weeks had the best fodder yield both at the initial (8.95 kg) and cumulative (3.60 kg) compared to other treatments. Crude protein, crude fibre and nitrogen free extract contents were significantly (p>0.05) influenced; and could adequately support the growth of ruminant animals. Thus, it can be concluded that C. cajan could be established using 40x60 cm planting space, harvested at 4 weeks interval and cutting at 50 cm height for maximum fodder yield with the aim of feeding ruminant animals.

References:

[1] Ahamefule, F.O., Ibeawuchi, J.A. and Ibe, S.N. (2006). Nutrient intake and utilization of pigeon pea-cassava peel based diets by WAD bucks. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 5, 419-424.
[2] Akinola, J. O. and Oyejola, A. (1994). Planting date and density effect of six pigeon pea cultivars at three Nigerian Savannah locations. Journal of Agricultural Science, 123: 233-264.
[3] Amaefule, K. U. and Obioha, F. C. (2001). Performance and nutrient utilization of broiler starters fed diets containing raw, boiled and dehulled pigeon pea seeds. Nigerian Journal of Animal Production, 28(1):31-39.
[4] Amaefule, K.U. and Onwudike, O.C. (2000). Comparative evaluation of the processing methods of pigeon pea. Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Environment, 1, 134-136.
[5] AOAC (2002). Association of official analytical chemists. Official Methods of Analysis, 17th ed. Published by association of official Analytical Chemists, Washington, D.C.
[6] Bekele-Tessema, A. (2007). Profitable agroforestry innovations for eastern Africa: experience from 10 agroclimatic zones of Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Eastern Africa Region
[7] Crop Trust (2014). Pigeon Pea: Food for Drought. www.croptrust.org
[8] Ecocrop, (2016). Ecocrop database. FAO, Rome, Italy
[9] Ekanayake, S.D., Jansz, E.R. and Nair, B.M. (1999). Proximate Composition, Minerals and Amino acid contents of mature (Anavaiza gladiate) seeds. Food Chemistry, 66.
[10] FAO, (2016a). Grassland Index. A searchable catalogue of grass and forage legumes. FAO, Rome, Italy
[11] FAO, (2016b). FAOSTAT. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
[12] ICRAF (1992). A selection of useful trees and shrubs for Kenya: Notes on their identification, propagation and management for use by farming and pastoral communities. ICRAF.
[13] ILRI (2013). Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) for livestock feed on small-scale farms. ILRI Forage Factsheet
[14] Kumar Rao, J. V., Dart, P. J., and Sastry, P. V., (1983). Residual effect of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) on yield and nitrogen response of maize. Experimental Agriculture, 19(2): 131 – 141.
[15] Mallikarjuna, N.; Saxena, K. B.; Jadhav, D. R., (2011). Cajanus. In: Chittaranjan Kole (Ed.). Wild crop relatives: genomic and breeding resources - legume crops and forages. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
[16] Mula, M. G., Saxena, K. B., Kumar, R. V. and Rathore, A. (2011). Influence of spacing and irrigation on the seed yield of a CMS line, ICPA 2043‟ of hybrid pigeon pea. Journal of Food legume, 24 (3): 202-206.
[17] Norton, B.W. (2003). The Nutritive values of trees legumes as dietary supplement for ruminants. In: Forage tree legumes in Tropical Agriculture. Editors Gutterridge, R.C. and Shelton, H.M. pp 171-191
[18] OAF (2015). Pigeon Pea - Long Rain Season, Kenya (2014). Farmers First, One Acre Fund, May 2015
[19] Pavan, A. S., Nagalikar, V. P., Halepyati, A. S. and Pujari, B. T. (2009): Effect of planting on the yield, yield components and economics of transplanted pigeon pea. Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Science, 22 (2): 433-434.
[20] Pipat, L., Wassana, L. and Wisitiporn, S. (2014): Effect of Cutting Interval and Cutting Height on Yield and Chemical Composition of King Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum x Pennisetum americanum). Asia-Pacific Chemical, Biological & Environmental Engineering Society, 8:27 – 31. DOI: 10.1016/j.apcbee.2014.01.075.
[21] SAS (2008): Statistical Analysis System, Computer software, version 9.2. Institute Inc., Cary, NC 27513, USA.
[22] Speranza, C.I., Kiteme, B. and Wiesmann, U. (2007): Droughts and famines: The underlying factors and the causal links among agro-pastoral households in semi-arid Makueni district, Kenya. Global Environmental Change. DOI: 101016/j.gloenvcha.2007.05.001.
[23] Telgate, N. C., Alur, R. P. and Parmar, J. N. (2004): Effect of fertility levels on yield of pigeon pea. Annals of Plant Physiology, 18 (1): 58-60.
[24] Valenzuela, H. (2011). Pigeon pea: A multipurpose crop for Hawaii. Hanai'Ai/The Food Provider, March-April-May edition: 1-8

Total View: 120 Downloads: 18 Page No: 0818-0822


Cite this Article:

MLA

Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob et al."Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan". International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878),vol 3, no. 3, 2018, pp.0818-0822 AI Publications doi:10.22161/ijeab/3.3.14

APA

Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob, P.(2018).Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan. International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).3(3), 0818-0822.10.22161/ijeab/3.3.14

Chicago

Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob, P.(2018).Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan. International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).3(3), pp.0818-0822.

Harvard

Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob. 2018."Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan". International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).3(3):0818-0822.Doi:10.22161/ijeab/3.3.14

IEEE

Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob."Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan", International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology,vol.3,no. 3, pp.0818-0822,2018.

Bibtex

@article { omotosooluwatosinbode2018effects,
title={Effects of Spacing, Cutting Height and Cutting Interval on Fodder Yield and Nutritional Value of Cajanus Cajan},
author={Omotoso Oluwatosin Bode, Fajemisin Adebowale Noah and Ogunshola Olawale Jacob , R},
journal={International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology},
volume={3},
year= {2018} ,
}