Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania

Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania ( Vol-4,Issue-3,May - June 2019 )

Author: Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone

ijeab doi crossref DOI: 10.22161/ijeab/4.3.8

Keyword: Common bean, drought, stress, yield components and yield

Abstract: Common bean cultivation is affected by drought up to 60% worldwide and makes the second for yield loss contribution after diseases. Despite the loss, it is estimated that over 75% of rural households in Tanzania depend on common bean for daily sustenance. The objective of the study was to evaluate the response of common bean genotypes in growth and yield characteristics under induced moisture stress in the field at Inyala Agriculture Training Institute in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania. In this study, eighteen common bean genotypes investigated included SER125, MR13905-6, and 41-EX- VAM, BFS20, RCB233, CZ109-22, CZ104-61, KG25-21, SER82, PASS, SER83, KG104-72, SER16, KG4-30, SER45, SER124, BFS60 and RCB266. The experiment was designated in a 3 x 18 split plot arranged in a complete randomized block design (CRBD) with three replications. The main plots were the three moisture treatments such as non moisture stress, stress at flowering and stress at mid pod filling and the sub plots were the common bean genotypes. The plants’ variables recorded were number of days to 50% flowering, number of days to 85% maturity, number of pods per plant, weight of pods per plant, weight of seeds per plant, number of seeds per pod, 100 seed weight and yield per hectare. The collected data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) using GenStat computer software 14th edition. The results showed significant (p < 0.05) differences between moisture treatments and bean genotypes. Genotypes SER16, BFS60, KG104-72 and CZ109-22 were significantly superior in grain yields Also, BFS60 was recorded with highest number of pods per plant, weight of pods per plant and weight of seeds per plant, while KG104-72 was recorded as the earliest in 50% flowering and 85% maturity. Genotype SER16 also excelled in weight of seeds per plant. These genotypes therefore can be considered as drought tolerant common bean genotypes and also can be used as parental materials for breeding programmes.

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Cite this Article:

MLA

Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone et al."Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania ". International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878),vol 4, no. 3, 2019, pp.643-651 AI Publications doi:10.22161/ijeab/4.3.8

APA

Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone, P.(2019).Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania . International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).4(3), 643-651.10.22161/ijeab/4.3.8

Chicago

Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone, P.(2019).Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania . International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).4(3), pp.643-651.

Harvard

Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone. 2019."Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania ". International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology(ISSN: 2456-1878).4(3):643-651.Doi:10.22161/ijeab/4.3.8

IEEE

Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone."Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania ", International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology,vol.4,no. 3, pp.643-651,2019.

Bibtex

@article { karantind.mazengo2019response,
title={Response of Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Drought for Growth and Yield Characteristics in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania },
author={Karantin D. Mazengo, George M. Tryphone , R},
journal={International Journal of Environment Agriculture and Biotechnology},
volume={4},
year= {2019} ,
}